Book and Music Discussion at DePaul

Mihaela reports: With the help of more than twenty community partners, the Chicago Public Library’s One Book One Chicago program has focused on expanding citywide community relations through events that facilitate learning and engagement not only with the OBOC selection but also with a book related theme essential to the lives of all Chicagoans.

DePaul University’s English Department has a longstanding partnership with OBOC. This winter quarter, Professor Francesca Royster of the English Department is teaching an undergraduate course exploring the current season’s selection,… Read more

Workshop at DHCS 2017

Reading Chicago Reading (RCR) co-PIs Robin Burke, Ana Lucic, John Shanahan, and Megan Bernal will be conducting a workshop at the twelfth annual meeting of the Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science (DHCS). The meeting takes place November 17-19, 2017, at the Illinois Tech downtown campus and brings together researchers and scholars in the humanities and computer science to examine the current state of digital humanities and to explore and identify new pathways of inquiry and perspectives for future research.

The workshop, Mining Diverse Texts for Location and Read more

“The Book is Just the Beginning,” Part 2

Mihaela writes: In the first segment of this two-part entry, we explored the variety of events offered by the Chicago Public Library at neighborhood branches during their One Book seasons. Over the years, the library has increased the number of events at physical branches. But CPL has also created innovative digital programs to encourage participation via Twitter chats, digital blog posts, and CHIRP Radio. This post is about such online programming.

For the 2014-2015 season, on Michael Chabon’s The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, OBOC launched chapter-by-chapter online “ReadingRead more

Digital Collections As Data

Ana Lucic, Digital Scholarship Librarian at DePaul and co-PI, writes:

Historically, circulation data and the demographic characteristics of library branch patrons have been used to analyze reading patterns and behaviors of different audiences. To date, our “Reading Chicago Reading” project has taken advantage of the circulation data we received from the Chicago Public Library and from the American Community Survey to shed light on the reception of different OBOC selections throughout diverse Chicago neighborhoods. See e.g. our earlier post.

We are also interested in the text … Read more